Photography, Travel

Perch Falls

Waterfall Detail: With its beginnings in Perch Lake the diminutive brook flows through a narrow dale along the nape of Marshall Mountain, eventually empting into Musquash Estuary. A few kilometers up from the confluence with the Musquash, the brook cuts through a gap in the bedrock. The igneous bedrock forms a ridge that is the division between the plateau and the estuary. Driving west along Route 1 just past Prince of Wales there is a notable drop from the plateau down into the broad estuary.

  • County: Saint John
  • Falls Height: 3 metres
  • Falls Type: Notch/Tiered
  • Latitude/Longitude: N 45° 12’ 26.0” / W 066° 16’ 03.7”
  • Property Ownership: Crown
  • Rating / Difficulty: **/Easy (Trail Roadside)
  • River System: Perch Brook
  • Scenic Route: Fundy Coastal Route
  • SNB Map Book: Page / Map Name: Page 91 / Musquash 21G/01

 

The waterfall is located just metres into the woods from a service road that runs out from Prince of Wales to the various lakes that fuel the many brooks and streams that form the Musquash Wetlands (Estuary). The wonderful little falls and pool is encapsulated within a narrow ravine. From here the brook continues through a series of culverts until it is beyond the highway.

To see this waterfall, drive west on Route 1 from Saint John and take the Prince of Wales turnoff. At the end of the exit ramp, continue straight through onto the service road directly across. You will immediately see a small pond on the right and a brook on the left. Just beyond the rock cut on the right there is a little used trail that leads to and emerges at the falls. After a rain the descent can become very slippery.

This is an easy waterfall to visit as it only takes a few minutes to access.

Visit Detail: I was provided information about Perch Falls from friends who are avid geo-cachers. They said the cascade was close to the service and they are not kidding. As I idled along the service road I could see the pool and a slight glimpse of the waterfalls beyond the undressed trees. Parked along side the road, I donned my hunting vest and hat, grabbed my camera and walked into the woods along the path to the falls. The short path is easily found by parking to the west of the rock cut.

This late in autumn there are few leaves remaining except for the yellow needles of the Tamarack. Dark skies and a light drizzles made for excellent conditions to photograph Perch Falls. I spent 20 or so minutes enjoying the reprise from the busy highway. Finishing up just before the skies opened up to a heavy rain I scurred up from the falls and back to my car

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