Inspiration, Lifestyle, Travel

Porter Brook FallsSep

Waterfall Detail: Just below the bridge over Porter Brook is the small moody, almost sullen waterfall. Porter Brook flows through a mixed farming and forest covered countryside in Holtville and confluences with the Southwest Miramichi River down river from Norrads Bridge. It is noted that Atlantic Salmon will make their way up the brook, climbing the rapids and falls to reach spawning grounds. The cooler water of the brook lures these mysterious creatures to its confines. The brook is not large but runs spritely across sandstone geology only to cascade over the igneous outcrop here at the falls.

Inspiration, Lifestyle, Photography, Travel

Second Falls

Waterfall Detail: In 1876, Daniel Gillmor built a watermill at Second Falls on the Magaguadavic River. Successive generations maintained mills on both sides of the river and as well other families established mills in the same area. The mighty river was used to drive timber to a common boom just above Second Falls Bridge, where the logs were separated according to individual markings. Over time the timber industry changed and the need for these mills diminished and all that remains is the beautiful waterfall.

Inspiration, Photography, Travel

Nature Moncton: A Hike to Memel Falls

Memel Falls

“We are used to this”, was the collective reply when I asked the small and enthusiastic group of Nature Moncton members if they wanted to hike to Memel Falls in the pouring rain.

I was invited down by the club to give a photo presentation of my Waterfalls of New Brunswick books. I eagerly accepted the opportunity and so I was on the road at 7:30 AM, listening to Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers. My first challenge was to find the Tankville School. The greater challenge will be leading a group of naturalist to the waterfall and back without issue. I know these folks are seasoned outdoor people, but there are many issues that can arise.

Inspiration, Lifestyle, Photography, Travel

Upper Prescott Brook Falls

Waterfall Detail: Following the Napoleonic Wars in Europe from 1803 to 1815, Britain was cut off from its timber supply in Eastern Europe. Unable to rely on traditional sources, Britain quickly turned to its North American colony as a new source. Albert County in particular was well suited to meet this demand, thanks to the geography of the area. With its large tracts of virgin timber, located on steep hills surrounded by river valleys which empty out into the Bay was an ideal location to harvest timber. Spruce and Tamarack were two of the species cut down and sent to the mills but White Pine was especially valuable since it was used to make the masts of wooden ships. All settlers of the area had been forbidden in their land deeds to cut white pine on their lands. All of the white pine in the province was reserved for the King and his Royal Navy. By the 1820’s a number of rivers had been dammed and water wheels built to power sawmills. Timber from these mills could be utilized to build wooden ships by local shipbuilding companies or transported by sailing vessels to other markets. Demand for timber grew to the point that the 1851 census for Albert County recorded 97 sawmills operating in the County.